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social and digital

This was my first time attending the Gilbane Conference, the conference solely devoted to all things content related. Gilbane gathers technologists, marketers, consultants and usability experts from near and far and takes place over three days annually each year in Boston. As the website reads, “The Gilbane Conference is all about helping organizations apply content, web, mobile, and marketing technologies to increase engagement by improving the digital experiences of their customers, employees, and partners.”

There was a lot to takeaway from the conference this year. So, here’s a quick overview of what I learned:

You could barely sneeze [and that was a lot considering the bad head cold I had] without hearing omnichannel discussed in almost every session I attended. There was a lot of debate during the content marketing panel over what the definition of omnichannel is versus multi-channel. Omnichannel argues for a shift in thinking – arguing for the seamless customer/member experience. This idea takes marketing one step further than the older multi-channel viewpoint that focuses on the delivery of content via multiple channels – push notifications and blasts of content. Reminds me a lot of what user experience professionals are after, only from a content perspective. Omni hopes to understand the customer, his/her interests and location (whether online or in-person), and to deliver the right content to the customer via the right channel at the right moment. Not an easy feat.

Personalization is harder than you think. While we’re all eager to use the data we’re able to collect on site visitors, uniquely and accurately presenting targeted content continues to be a real struggle for even the biggest brands out there. There isn’t a magic wand (whether through a CMS and/or a marketing automation tool) that exists to perfectly target and execute content. Much of this effort still requires significant manual effort and time.

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My favorite session was the “Wearables and The Internet of Things” session where presenters Raimund Gross of SAP and Adam Buhler of DigitasLBi reviewed some the latest technologies they’ve tested and gave their predictions on tools to come. From insect cyborgs (neural implants in cockroaches) to discussion around universal wi-fi, this was a really fun session. Here are just a few nuggets from that session:

Wearables are still very much an extension of mobile devices. There is a unique intimacy that exists with a wearable that doesn’t exist with a mobile phone. A watch can take your pulse and communicate to its wearer via “Taptic” feedback in a way that your phone or glasses can’t. Buhler gave the example of getting directions via pulses on your wrist (reminded me of the way you might guide a horse when riding) that lets you know when to turn and in which direction, subtly. This is a form of communication that is new, the features are new, and that means the need and opportunity exists for a new form of content delivery and design.

Buhler predicts that we will hear from Apple in 2015 on what they’ve learned from Google Glass. Neither presenter thinks it will continue to exist for the public in its current form, but is a stepping-stone for improved products, especially for the workforce.

Discussion around virtual wallets took place. Will ApplePay and Google Wallet continue to achieve adoption? ApplePay, GoogleWallet, Venmo – lots happening around digital payment and the death of cash. [There’s a recent article in Bloomberg Businesweek I read this week – Cash is for Losers – that is worth the read.]

There is great buzz around Apple’s HomeKit that is launching at CES 2015. Get ready for your fridge to tell you when your milk has expired and for your lights to dim and thermostat to adjust when you casually voice command “It’s time for bed.”

All around, there is a lot to get excited about. What are your tech predictions for the coming year?

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Hello, my friends! It’s been a long time since my last post and with good reason. My husband and I are expecting our first child!! I’m currently 28 weeks pregnant and if you’re curious what the gender is, you can probably guess based on the random craving I’m having today:

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Yep, it’s a girl!

I’m told from this Ted Talk by Ina May Gaskin that Amish women normally make loaves of bread after going into birth. While I don’t plan on suddenly becoming Martha Stewart, I have been experiencing an odd cooking interest over the past week, so I’ll let you know if my cupcake recipes pan out.

Other than that, I just returned from ASAE Annual 2013 (#ASAE13) in Atlanta, Georgia where I was able to catch up with many of the association pals that I love, attend fantastic sessions, and present my session with David DeLorenzo, CIO, National League of Cities on Future Proofing Your Association’s Technology. A marvelous write up on our session by Ernie Smith is in Associations Now). I also contributed a few takeaways from my visit to the DelCor blog.

Here’s a fun photo from the Memberclicks Small Staff ShinDig at #ASAE13

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What are you celebrating this summer?

What were your favorite moments from #ASAE13?

 

Responsive Design has been the buzz word along with “Big Data” in the association community for the past year and there’s a good reason why. With 2013 deemed “The Year of Responsive Design” by Mashable.com, as well as forecasted by many to be the year that mobile browsing surpasses desktop browsing, associations need to have a solid mobile solution.

As all of us have now become comfortable with carrying and relying on multiple devices (tablets, smartphones, laptops, desktops) to tackle our work and manage our communications, we will no doubt embrace even more as new and evolved products continue to infiltrate the market. Just consider the tabtop and phablet.

If associations want their content to be consumed, then they must think beyond traditional mobile sites and native apps as there one and only mobile solution, and really look at their website.

In a recent interview with ResultsDirect’s Cecilia Satovich on DelCor Sweet Spot Live, I asked her the big questions surrounding responsive design, the triumphs, challenges, and reasons why she considers it a solid solution.

Is your association considering moving to a responsive web design? What are the questions you still have?

Last week the annual ASAE Technology Conference took place in Washington, DC, as well as the Higher Logic User Group (HUG) and DelCor’s first ever user group, DUG. As an outgoing three year member of the ASAE Technology Council that helps choose the sessions for #Tech12, it was feeling of accomplishment, as well as reunion of sorts for the bustling association tech community. My overview on the Conference will be posted to the DelCor blog tomorrow, so look there for more details from the event! 

However, one moment worth mentioning twice was meeting the opening keynote of #Tech12, Brian Solis. A big fan of his books and blogs, it was an honor shaking his hand and grabbing a quick photo with the business analyst.

For more on the Conference, as well as my interview with Craig Sorrell, the Project Coordinator at AIHA, please read my post on the DelCor blog tomorrow.

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Today is National Preparedness Day  

Is your association prepared for a disaster? What about your family or pet? Join me and the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Team on Friday, September 21 from 12:30-1:30pm ET on DelCor Sweet Spot Live as we discuss tips on getting prepared and look at how NACCHO is using social media to spread the word. What your question answered? Join us live tomorrow and Tweet your question to us at @KyleeCoffman or #sweetspot.

Also, here’s a fun look at the Call Me Maybe meme the American Public Health Association (APHA) put together to get the word out about National Preparedness Month.

 

Eleven years ago today I was a college student, renting a two bedroom on the North side of Chicago. I was sleeping when my roommate, a New Yorker, ventured into my room and shook me awake, crying, “World War III!! It’s World War III!” Confused by the flickering lights on the television, still half-asleep, that “bullet-proof, untouchable Americanism” I was brought up with (unknowingly) suddenly became quite known to me. The L-train wouldn’t venture downtown. Classes were cancelled. Everyone waited and watched, wondering if their city was next.

Having traveled through Israel last month, meeting renowned journalists like Aluf Benn and Khaled Abu Toameh, I was constantly aware of how much historical and political knowledge (globally speaking) I lack and the luxury and challenge I have, as an American, to overcome that ignorance. Upon returning, I’ve registered for a free, 12-week course offered through Coursera by Princeton University, History of the World Since 1300. This online class has over 30,000 registrants from around the world, gathering and communicating online twice a week. Fascinating to me is how digital technology is continuing to evolve, allowing us to connect and learn globally from top universities and each other through start ups like Coursera and Audacity in ways few of us ever could before.

What is your memory of September 11?

What are you doing this year to continue your learning and professional development?

Associations have always been in the business of community building and advocacy. Like almost every other company out there, associations are (or should be) eagerly trying to catch up with technology trends and discover where discussions are taking place online surrounding their industry.

Many association executives struggle with learning the social media tools, messaging, and means of engagement and aren’t sure how to properly lead their organization and staff into building dedicated social media programs.

On Friday, June 29 from 12:30-1:30pm EST, Megan Berry will join DelCor’s Sweet Spot Live host Kylee Coffman to discuss what associations can do now to help build their online communities.

Megan Berry is the Founder of LiftFive, partnered with Lerer Ventures to help top startups with social. She previously led marketing at Klout for two years, after starting as the fourth employee. She blogs about social media on the Huffington Post, Mashable and more.  

Basically, yes, you will want to ask her questions while the opportunity comes a’knockin. Have a question you’d like to ask her in advance? Post your comment below! You can also follow her on Twitter at @meganberry.

Mark your calendar! It’s gonna be a good one.